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Shariah Law Guide

 

Conclusion

Shariah funds, like other investment vehicles which have a process driven by more than the simple desire for profit, should be considered in that context.
For investors who do not wish to comply with Shariah law, there are few reasons to invest in a fund that operates under its restrictions, except where one believes the individual group or manager is of sufficient skill to warrant exposure on those grounds alone, or where the Shariah fund invests in regions, assets or companies which would otherwise not be available for non-Shariah investors.
For those who believe in the principles of Shariah and for the many followers of Islam, this burgeoning group of new vehicles represents an exciting opportunity to gain access to professional fund management expertise, and for some the chance to profit from the growth of their own regional economies, without offending the principles of their faith.
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